New Jersey Divorce Mediation

shutterstock_314959079WHAT IS IT?

In New Jersey, divorce mediation is a dispute resolution process in which an impartial third party, the mediator, facilitates negotiations among disputants to help them reach a mutually acceptable settlement.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS?

In most instances, mediation can save the parties both time and money. Most importantly, mediation is confidential and, therefore, an excellent forum for resolving sensitive matrimonial disputes. Additionally, settlements can often be reached without having to first initiate divorce proceedings with the court.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?

By making a phone call to our office, we can provide you information regarding how the process works and what the expected costs are. The most important precondition is a willingness by both parties to explore whether mediation will work for them. Usually, after the initial telephone consultation, a joint session can be arranged where the process can be explained to you and your spouse.

DO I STILL NEED AN ATTORNEY?

In most cases, the answer to this question will be yes. However, ideally, your attorney will be serving in an advisory role and providing you with the legal advice you need to effectively negotiate a settlement with your spouse, rather than preparing you for costly, public litigation. If you already have an attorney, you may advise that attorney that you are interested in pursuing mediation as an alternative. If you wish, we can provide your attorney with information concerning how the process works and what their role will be if mediation is pursued.

WHY DO WE RECOMMEND MEDIATION?

Stories abound about how the divorce litigation process is costly, time-consuming, and, in cases involving children, often damaging. Many of us have friends and family who have been subjected to unnecessary stress, uncertainty, and expense by divorce litigation. Through its philosophy of self-determination, mediation seeks to put the divorcing spouses in control of the divorce process and the result. Settlements can be accomplished with less acrimony than in litigated divorce cases.